Bloomfield Track

Bloomfield Track

I first traveled the Bloomfield track in the 90’s and can remember how challenging it was back then.

Taken while on tour

Taken while on tour

Since those early days, I have traversed the track numerous times and have seen many improvements with two bridges currently (2013) being constructed that should make the track trafficable (by 4WD) for most of the year.

The Creation of the Bloomfield Track

The Bloomfield Track (also known as the coast road to Cooktown) was pushed through the fragile untouched wilderness

Black Mountain

Black Mountain

region north of Cape Tribulation in 1984 and connects the aboriginal community of Wujal Wujal (a former aboriginal mission called Bloomfield) to Cape Tribulation. The track is surrounded by mountains and deep valleys and combined with the climatic conditions of the area, streams are prone to quickly rise with little warning due to the 1,000 meter high mountain ranges around the catchment and the influence of the cyclonic forces in the adjacent Coral Sea. To avoid environmental impact, the 30 km track was constructed with few switchbacks and bends on the steep sections resulting in the need for specialised vehicles to traverse the road, especially in wet weather.  Sightings of Cassowary’s and Crocodiles are common and a variety of Ecosystems are experienced along the way.

Perentie ToursAt the time its construction the track was controversial and inspired protests and blockades by environmentalists who felt that it would bring unwanted development and put the area at risk. The blockades drew national and international attention to the area resulting in the area being declared a World Heritage site after a battle in the High Court of Australia.

 

Bloomfield Track

Bloomfield Track

More information can be found at  http://www.thebloomfieldtrack.com/

or have a look at the Perentie Tours home page

 

About Gary Bondeson

Gary has been directly involved in tourism in Far North Queensland since the 1990’s. His passion for the area was inspired by the rich history and many points of interest concentrated in the region and felt a strong desire to share this with others. Gary is heavily involved with tourism development and even co-hosted an episode of the popular travel show 'The Great Outdoors’ with Tom Williams showing the limestone caves of Chillagoe located 200kms west of Cairns. After being away for 5 years, Gary has now returned to the area that he holds so dear to his heart to share his knowledge and experience with those who wish to have a Fair Dinkum Ozzy experience.

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